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Funeral, Casket and Urn Answers

Our Answers is the place to keep in-the-know with common questions and answers about buying a casket or urn online, shipping and delivery information, general casket and coffin questions, your rights as an American consumer (FTC consumer protection), funeral planning and the most commonly questions customers asked. We also offer further information to help you such as funeral planning tips and advice.

To get started, click on each category below to explore by topic.

  1. Caskets and Coffins
    1. 1. What's better, wood casket or metal casket?

      100% personal choice and preference. Some purchase metal caskets so the casket maintains its integrity once buried. But then others who prefer wood caskets tend to do so that like the natural elements of the body, the casket can disintegrate over time and go back to the ground/earth. Many religious families may prefer the wood casket on this premise.

      Both wood caskets and metal caskets can be adorned inside with a variety of furnishings. This category is basically the same for both casket types. In most cases, any furnishing that can be added to one can be added to the other. The internal furnishings come down to a matter of personal taste and preference.

      External Appearance?: Wood?
      Wood tends to have a 'warmer', more traditional appearance. It also tends to be more elegant, less flashy and shiny appearance. Wood can be adorned with almost any type of external decorations that you might desire.

      External Appearance?: Metal
      Metal tends to be 'colder' and have a more austere appearance. It also tends to be preferred by a more progressive customer with somewhat flashier, more modern taste.

      Metal provides an advantage over wood in this category in that it can be molded and stamped with almost any type of design that one might desire for the eternal resting place of your loved one.

      Environmental Concerns
      Wood caskets can be designed in such a way that it will last a very long time, but will ultimately break down and return back to natural elements in the soil.
      However, if being environmentally friendly is not a primary concern, wooden caskets can be treated and constructed to last almost as long as metal caskets. Although, wooden caskets will ultimately return to the earth as its ecological basic components while metal caskets may contain components that could take much longer to fully decompose.

      Metal caskets takes much longer to break down and return to ecological basics than wood. If you are looking for protection then metal is the obvious choice. It can be coated with a variety of chemicals to prevent rust and corrosion and it can also be hermetically sealed to provide the maximum amount of environmental protection for your loved one. Also, the level of protection can be selected because metal caskets can be made from various thicknesses of metals. It can also be designed to be crush proof and almost completely impervious to outside forces.

    2. 2. Will my funeral home charge me a special handling fee for a casket bought online?

      No. It is illegal for a funeral establishment to charge a handling fee if you wish to use a family-built casket or purchase one from someplace other than the funeral home, such as a cheaper casket online.

      It is also illegal for funeral establishment staff to make false claims about the preservative qualities of a casket or to charge contagious disease fees or fees for protective clothing for staff.

    3. 3. Do I have to buy a casket from a funeral home?

      No, and CasketandCoffin.com offers a great alternative. We're committed to providing a stress-free experience by offering a large selection of products - all priced much lower than funeral homes, and the fastest delivery times including same day delivery.

      Did you know, in the USA the law protects consumers by allowing you to purchase funeral items including burial caskets from a source other than funeral homes?

      Moreover, a funeral home is not allowed to refuse a casket or funeral related merchandise that had been purchased somewhere else. They are not allowed to charge you or your family additional fees for accepting a casket or increase the service price of the funeral because of it.

      A funeral home will treat you or your family no different than if you had purchased a casket from them. Buy direct from CasketandCoffin.com, and receive a stress-free delivery, at reduced prices.

    4. 4. What is the difference in your metal caskets that are 18 gauge or 20 gauge ? Is one better than the other?

      The simple difference between the 18 gauge versus 20 gauge is that 18 gauge steel means it would take 18 sheets stacked against each other to be equivalent to one inch thickness. Similar to 20 gauge steel. Thus the thicker the steel, the lower the gauge.

      We often are asked which one is better? It's a personal decision as it's simply the thickness of the steel and the way the industry measures it. If your preference is a thicker steel, then the 18 gauge steel casket is the right choice. Almost all of the metal caskets sold at CasketandCoffin.com are manufactured with 18 gauge steel.

    5. 5. Where are your caskets made?

      All metal caskets as steel, stainless steel, copper and bronze are made in the USA and some parts and caskets imported.

      Our wood caskets are made using the premium woods available from Canada's natural resource. Both of our wood caskets and metal caskets are stored and shipped direct from the warehouses throughout the USA. This is why we can provide the fastest casket delivery within 3 business days at no extra costs.

    6. 6. What is a coffin?

      We get asked often the difference between a casket and coffin when people begin planning for a funeral.

      When you browse for a coffin online, you'll find there is not much difference between a casket and coffin. The terminology of a coffin and casket is often used together, and interchangeable when describing the burial proceedings of a loved one. But while the function or purpose of a coffin is the same as a casket,  there are subtle difference.

      Coffins are often described as a container that holds the deceased body, and was used to describe the burial box since the early 16th century. A coffin originated from the French, referred to as cofin. It was used in the context to display and contain a deceased or dead person. The purpose of the coffin for display is still used today in the ceremonial proceedings of a funeral, and the burial or cremation.

      Originating from the Old French, coffins were described from the meaning of a basket. Though the history of the English throughout Europe, it become known as simply a coffin (vs. cofin or basket). But not in modern French, its evolved to become better known as couffin, which translates to a meaning of cradle (vs. basket).

      Over the centuries with the development of North America, the term of coffin has been better known as a casket. The term of coffin in the North American culture, is depicted in the mythological legends of Dracula and related stories. But regardless of calling it a coffin or casket, throughout the world the coffin is used for the same purpose, with the primary subtle difference in the shape of the box.

      The coffin traditionally will show six sides to its structure and design, whereas the funeral casket is only four. But with most caskets these days, you'll find that while caskets are only four-sided, the top lid of the casket is crafted with a design to accent the look-and-feel of a six-sided coffin.

      Among the differences in the number of edges of the burial box, the top of the coffin will open fully, whereas with caskets most will have a split 1/4 top that opens, and the remaining 3/4 of the lid can remain closed.

      Coffin is often a much more simpler burial box today for funerals. You'll find most caskets online for sale, or in a funeral home, are now fully furnished with craftsman designs, high-gloss, and a numerous other artistic 'flair' to showcase the luxurious presentation of the burial box.

      So where then did the term casket come from and become associated to a coffin? It's not 100% known, but during the centuries the word casket was used to describe a jewelry box, and other small boxes to store valuable items. Around the 19th century, the name of casket evolved to become synonymous with coffin.

    7. 7. What is a vault?

      A vault is used to prevent the ground from caving in over a casket due to the eventual sinking of a grave.

      Vaults are not required by law, however, most cemeteries require a vault to keep the ground level.

      Basic vaults are made of concrete where as more elaborate models are made of precious metals such as bronze.

      It's not mandatory you purchase a vault if you're having a casket buried. Some people prefer to purchase a vault to protect the casket from ground caving in on the casket, but overall its a personal choice if you want to have a vault or not.

    8. 8. Do you sell an Aurora casket?

      No. Aurora caskets are manufactured by Aurora exclusively, and are available exclusively through authorized dealers; such as funeral homes.

      The Aurora company typically works with licensed funeral homes to offer a variety of caskets for your funeral services. At CasketandCoffin.com we do not sell Aurora caskets, however you will find a beautiful selection of caskets online with the detailed craftsmanship and designs thousands of families have purchased to rest their loved ones.

      We encourage customers to compare our selection of caskets and premium caskets to an Aurora casket or Batesville Casket.

    9. 9. Do you sell a Batesville casket?

      No. Batesville caskets are manufactured by Batesville exclusively, and are available exclusively through authorized dealers; such as funeral homes.

      Batesville also offers pre-planning for funerals, including the manufacture of caskets. The Batesville company typically works with licensed funeral homes to offer a variety of caskets for your funeral services. At CasketandCoffin.com we do not sell Batesville caskets. You can however find an exquisite selection of caskets for sale with the detailed craftsmanship and designs that thousands of families have trusted to rest their loved ones. The caskets sold at C&C (CasketandCoffin.com) are manufactured and distributed (at wholesale pricing with overnight delivery) through one of the largest casket networks in the United States.

      We encourage customers to compare our selection of caskets and premium caskets to a Batesville casket or an Aurora casket.

  2. Consumer Rights
    1. 1. Will my cemetery accept a gravesite marker or memorial market if I purchase from a 3rd party?

      You may purchase a marker or monument from a source other than the funeral home, cemetery or mortuary, but it also must meet cemetery standards, and the cemetery may not charge a setting fee if the monument company sets it for you.

      Be sure to review the rules and policies of the cemetery before you purchase. This can help avoid misunderstandings and can assist you in making your decisions. In addition to the price of the marker or monument, there is an installation fee with every order.

    2. 2. Will my funeral home charge me a special handling fee for a casket bought online?

      No. It is illegal for a funeral establishment to charge a handling fee if you wish to use a family-built casket or purchase one from someplace other than the funeral home, such as a cheaper casket online.

      It is also illegal for funeral establishment staff to make false claims about the preservative qualities of a casket or to charge contagious disease fees or fees for protective clothing for staff.

    3. 3. Will my funeral home accept a casket I purchase from CasketandCoffin.com?

      Yes. It is against Federal Law for a funeral home to refuse a casket purchased elsewhere.

      Refusal to do so results in a $10,000 fine per incident to the funeral establishment and may possibly lead to the suspension of their license to operate a funeral business.

      For additional security over your rights, learn more about consumer rights and funeral products, and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) funeral rule that helps protect consumers, and opens the funeral product market from its historical monopoly.

    4. 4. What are my choices as a consumer?

      You have 100% full control over your final wishes. You're entitled to choices that don't make you feel paying more reflects your respect and love for your loved one.

      Funeral services are custom, just as weddings. They can be in any shape or form you choose. Your thoughts and wishes are what are important, whether you follow your religious burial rights, or a personalized family experience to pay respect. Its you're choice.

      Remember, there is no such thing as a "Traditional" funeral. We understand its a difficult and stressful time from the passing of a loved one. And these emotional times should mean you should be taken advantage of higher costs and perceived convenience that has been considered the "normal" way to do things as suggested by the funeral director. You can work with the funeral director on your funeral services and still save by purchasing one of our caskets shipped directly to the funeral home. The funeral home may just as likely do the same and ship in your casket of choice from their warehouse or supplier out-of-state.

    5. 5. What are my rights as a consumer?

      The Funeral Rule, enforced by the Federal Trade Commission, makes it easier for you to choose only those goods and services you want or need and to pay for only those you select.

      According to the Funeral Rule, you can find out the cost of individual items whether you shop by telephone or in person. If you inquire about funeral arrangements in person, the funeral home must give you a written price list of available goods and services (GPL or General Price List).

      Keep in mind that when you arrange for a funeral, you can buy a package of goods and services or individual items. If you want to buy a casket for example, the funeral provider must supply a list that describes the available selections and their prices.

      Remember, the funeral provider may not refuse or charge a fee, to handle a casket you bought elsewhere. Be wary of funeral homes that do not have any caskets priced below $800.00. This is a sure sign you are paying far too much.

    6. 6. Do I have to buy a casket from a funeral home?

      No, and CasketandCoffin.com offers a great alternative. We're committed to providing a stress-free experience by offering a large selection of products - all priced much lower than funeral homes, and the fastest delivery times including same day delivery.

      Did you know, in the USA the law protects consumers by allowing you to purchase funeral items including burial caskets from a source other than funeral homes?

      Moreover, a funeral home is not allowed to refuse a casket or funeral related merchandise that had been purchased somewhere else. They are not allowed to charge you or your family additional fees for accepting a casket or increase the service price of the funeral because of it.

      A funeral home will treat you or your family no different than if you had purchased a casket from them. Buy direct from CasketandCoffin.com, and receive a stress-free delivery, at reduced prices.

    7. 7. Will my funeral home accept a casket or urn I buy online?

      100% yes. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) in the United States of America requires all funeral homes to accept caskets purchased from CasketandCoffin.com or any other third party.

      We recommend that you inform your funeral home of your casket order prior to delivery, or have us contact the funeral home on your behalf.

      If your funeral home denies you the right to receive one of our caskets, or attempts to charge you a fee, feel free to call us to have us contact them on your behalf. It's the law that they accept the caskets from us, and the financial penalties for them to deny you this right can be exuberant.

    8. 8. What is the Funeral Rule from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC)?

      The Funeral Rule was created to protect you, the consumer, and to regulate the funeral industry.

      One key aspect of the Funeral Rule is that the funeral provider cannot refuse to handle a casket or urn you bought online, such as an online casket from CasketandCoffin.com. Among which, the funeral provider cannot refuse to handle a casket or urn bought at a local casket store, or somewhere else - or charge you a fee to do it. The funeral home cannot require you to be there when the casket or urn is delivered to them.

      The Funeral Rule, enforced by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), makes it possible for the consumer (you) to choose only those goods and services you want or need and to pay only for those you select, whether you are making arrangements when a death occurs or in advance. The Rule allows you to compare prices among funeral homes, and makes it possible for you to select the funeral arrangements you want at the home you use. Learn more about your rights and the Funeral Rule at the Federal Trade Commission website.

      The Funeral Rule provides protection to the consumer in the areas of:


      • Buy only the funeral arrangements you want.

      • Get price information on the telephone.

      • Get a written, itemized price list when you visit a funeral home.

      • See a written casket price list before you see the actual caskets.

      • See a written outer burial container price list.

      • Receive a written statement after you decide what you want, and before you pay.

      • Get an explanation in the written statement from the funeral home that describes any legal cemetery or crematory requirement that requires you to buy any funeral goods or services.

      • Use an "alternative container" instead of a casket for cremation.

      • Provide the funeral home with a casket or urn you buy elsewhere. Make funeral arrangements without embalming.

    9. 9. Will the funeral home charge a handling fee or any extra charge for purchasing a casket online, or another source?

      No. It is against the law.

      No handling fee will be, or should be charged. It is illegal for a funeral home to charge a handling fee for purchasing a casket elsewhere since the passing of the FTC's Funeral Rule.

  3. Cremation
    1. 1. What is cremation?

      It's the process of reducing the body to ashes and bone fragments through the use of intense heat. The process usually takes two to four hours. Depending on the size of the body, the cremated remains will weigh three to nine pounds. The bone fragments are pulverized to about aquarium gravel texture. Depending on the fuel and temperature used, they are some-where between a light grey and white color.

      More and more Americans are now shopping online for funeral related products to buy direct thanks to the changes by the Federal Trade Commission's Funeral Rule. Browse cremation urns for sale and prices up to 70% off with delivery included. Browse urn prices for marble urns to wood urns and special urn keepsakes.

      Did you know the percentage of cremations in the US is rapidly rising each year. In 12 states the cre-mation rate is over 50%. In England and Japan the cremation rate is close to 90%. In 2005, 46% of Americans said they will choose cre-mation for themselves. Primary reasons for choosing cremation are to save money, be-cause it is simpler, less emotional and more convenient, and to save land.

       

    2. 2. How much does cremation cost?

      If an undertaker is used to transport the body, obtain permits, and file the death certificate, the average fee is $1,200 (in 2008). However, prices can vary from about $500 to well over $3,000, often in the same market. If a visitation or a funeral service is held before cremation, the charges will be higher.

      Many funeral consumer alliances offer members cremation services provided by funeral or cremation businesses for considerably less than the national average. Families who care for their own dead can use crematories directly at charges from $200 to $400 (2008).

       

    3. 3. What can be done with the ashes after cremation?

      They can be placed in a niche in a columbarium, buried, scattered, or kept by the family. Cremated remains are sterile and pose no health hazard. Their disposition is, for the most part, not controlled, provided the landowner grants permission.
      A columbarium is an assembly of niches designed to hold containers of cremated remains. It is most often located in a mausoleum with a cemetery and at some churches.

      Earth burial can be done in a cemetery or on private property. Most cemeteries will permit two or three containers in one adult-size plot. Some (unnecessarily) require that you purchase an urn vault. For home burial, keep in mind that unless you have a family cemetery on your property, eventually the land is likely to be sold and the land used for other purposes.

      Scattering cremains over an area that had significance to the deceased is legal in most jurisdictions. Although there are commercial firms which will handle the cremated remains for a fee, most families prefer to do this themselves. Remains that are being scattered should be processed by the crematory to reduce all fragments to fine particles.

      Scattering at sea is available to all veterans and dependents and is provided by the Navy or Coast Guard. Because sea burials are done at the convenience of the military, the family may not witness sea burial.

      While federal regulations technically require cremated remains to be scattered three miles out from shore, the Environmental Protection Agency says they are not concerned about families scattering ashes at the beach and never enforce this regulation with private families.

      Keep the cremated remains in an urn or nice box. You can buy an urn from a funeral home or on line, or you can use something else. When cremains are being saved to provide memories, it's nice to put them in a container related to the de-ceased's life, such as a favorite vase or dignified funeral urn, a special wine bottle, a terrarium, etc.

      Some funeral homes will suggest that you need to purchase a "temporary container", but you have a legal right to refuse and use the container that comes from the crematory and buy an urn online (or container) to store the cremated ashes. Some people will even have the cremated ashes compressed through a process into jewelry, known as cremation jewelry.

      Cremains can also be divided among family members to keep or to be sprinkled or buried in several different places (i.e. with a first and second spouse).

    4. 4. Is a funeral service necessary?

      No. However many people may choose a funeral services for a final goodbye surrounded by all those who loved or knew the person.

      Specific to a funeral where person will be cremated, a visitation and a funeral service with a body present may be held before cremation or you may choose to have a memorial service without the body present. Cremation simply makes it possible to take more time to plan a service at a convenient time.

    5. 5. How to shop around for a cremation services

      All funeral homes are required to list a price for a simple cremation package, called an "Immediate Cremation." This is cremation without any services such as a viewing or funeral at the funeral home. You also are not required to buy a cremation container or urn from the funeral home directly. You can continue with the cremation services, and order an urn or cremation jewelry online at much lessor costs than buying from a funeral home. This also gives the consumer more time to shop around for the perfect cremation container or storage for the loved-ones cremated ashes.

      You can plan a memorial service at another time and location without inviting the funeral director. This also gives you the option of hiring an out-of-town funeral home that might be significantly less expensive than your local homes. There can be a huge difference between funeral homes on the cost of a direct cremation. Therefore, it pays to shop around. All funeral homes are required to give prices over the telephone.

      First, ask for the price of "a direct cremation with a minimum alternative container." Then ask, "Does that include the crematory fee?" Then ask if there are any additional charges (such as for permits)

    6. 6. Is a casket required for cremation?

      No, a casket is never required for cremation, however many people may choose a cremation casket for consideration of a casket showing at a funeral, or a more dignified way of cremation. Cremation caskets are among the cheap caskets available due to the minimal material required.

      However, most crematories do require that the body be enclosed in a rigid, combustible container. Under federal regulations, all mortuaries must make available an inexpensive cremation container often referred to as an alter-native container.

  4. General
    1. 1. How long have you been in business?

      Our network has been in business since March, 2003 and have demonstrated a 100% on-time delivery performance since June 2010.

      Our network is one of the largest and most reputable in the funeral industry, where our network supplies Walmart, Costco, the US military and many other reputable house-hold brands. However, the variety and styles will vary across each brand.

    2. 2. What is a cemetery service?

      A cemetery service involves the opening and closing graves, crypts or niches; setting grave liners and vaults; setting markers; and long-term maintenance of cemetery grounds and facilities. These services are typically performed within the funeral services provided by a funeral home.

      Learn about other common funeral terms and words used by funeral homes and within the death industry to help you be more informed before buying any funeral service, casket or other funeral product.

       

  5. Shipping & Delivery
    1. 1. Where are caskets shipped from?

      All caskets and urns are shipped from our network warehouses throughout the United States to expedite the delivery process.

      We only ship to the United States of America at this time. Special requests can be made for Canadian or international purchases, but please call customer care directly to discuss the options.

      Be cautious consumers of caskets manufactured or shipped from China or abroad.

    2. 2. How soon will my casket be shipped?

      Caskets will be ordered and shipped as soon as an order has been placed and are primarily delivered via Fedex. Normal delivery time is next day delivery if ordered before noon eastern standard time.

      Rush same day delivery is also available for a nominal extra cost. We offer both same day delivery, and delivery over a 1-3 day period.

      Please visit our Delivery and Shipping schedule to see how fast a casket can be delivered to your location.

    3. 3. Which caskets include Standard Next-Day Delivery?

      All wood caskets and metal caskets include standard next-day delivery.

      See Sales & Delivery Policy for more information, or visit our casket delivery schedule to see how fast your casket can be delivered. Options available include overnight casket delivery, next-day delivery, and 1-3 day delivery.

  6. Urns
    1. 1. What can be done with the ashes after cremation?

      They can be placed in a niche in a columbarium, buried, scattered, or kept by the family. Cremated remains are sterile and pose no health hazard. Their disposition is, for the most part, not controlled, provided the landowner grants permission.
      A columbarium is an assembly of niches designed to hold containers of cremated remains. It is most often located in a mausoleum with a cemetery and at some churches.

      Earth burial can be done in a cemetery or on private property. Most cemeteries will permit two or three containers in one adult-size plot. Some (unnecessarily) require that you purchase an urn vault. For home burial, keep in mind that unless you have a family cemetery on your property, eventually the land is likely to be sold and the land used for other purposes.

      Scattering cremains over an area that had significance to the deceased is legal in most jurisdictions. Although there are commercial firms which will handle the cremated remains for a fee, most families prefer to do this themselves. Remains that are being scattered should be processed by the crematory to reduce all fragments to fine particles.

      Scattering at sea is available to all veterans and dependents and is provided by the Navy or Coast Guard. Because sea burials are done at the convenience of the military, the family may not witness sea burial.

      While federal regulations technically require cremated remains to be scattered three miles out from shore, the Environmental Protection Agency says they are not concerned about families scattering ashes at the beach and never enforce this regulation with private families.

      Keep the cremated remains in an urn or nice box. You can buy an urn from a funeral home or on line, or you can use something else. When cremains are being saved to provide memories, it's nice to put them in a container related to the de-ceased's life, such as a favorite vase or dignified funeral urn, a special wine bottle, a terrarium, etc.

      Some funeral homes will suggest that you need to purchase a "temporary container", but you have a legal right to refuse and use the container that comes from the crematory and buy an urn online (or container) to store the cremated ashes. Some people will even have the cremated ashes compressed through a process into jewelry, known as cremation jewelry.

      Cremains can also be divided among family members to keep or to be sprinkled or buried in several different places (i.e. with a first and second spouse).

    2. 2. What size of urn should I buy?

      A general rule when determining the ideal size of urn is that every 1 pound of body weight, prior to cremation, equals about one cubic inch of capacity in the urn.

      For example, if your loved one weighed 200 lbs, then the urn capacity should be able to hold approximately 200 cubic inches.

      Again, it's a general rule and these rules vary based on the crematoriums processing and preparation.

      We label our urns with either adult / large or child / infant to help make it easy to select the proper size for your loved one.

      Keepsakes usually have 5 cubic inches or less, and the same rule applies if you're purchasing an urn for a pet.

    3. 3. Can I carry the remains on an airplane?

      The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) requires all urns to be carried onboard or in checked luggage to pass testing for explosive devices. This has been in place since Sept 11th, 2011.

      Carry-on: All carry-on items must pass through the x-ray machine. If the urn is made of a material that prevents the screener from clearly seeing what is inside, the container will not be allowed through security.

      Checked Baggage: You may transport the urn provided it is successfully screened. TSA performs screening using a variety of techniques and if cleared, it will be permitted as checked baggage only.

      IMPORTANT:
      Check with your airline first before attempting to transport an urn in checked baggage.

      When necessary, the cremated remains can be in a wooden or plastic urn for shipment. A heavy metal or lead-lined urn should be empty and unsealed in checked luggage. Upon reaching your destination, the cremated remains can be transferred from the wooden urn or plastic urn into the heavy metal urn. At all times during shipment, legal documentation and permits must be attached to the urn.

    4. 4. Can cremated remains be shipped or delivered?

      Yes, cremated remains can be shipped. We recommend using the United States Postal Service as they have experience in these type of shipping requests, and can provide a tracking system for you to monitor the shipment and delivery.

      For cremated remains to be shipped international, be aware each country may have specific and strict laws and requirements that must be followed. We recommend you check with the consulate office of the country you plan to ship the remains, and obtain a copy of their regulations.

      It's not advised to ship the remains to a foreign country outside the United States of America using the standard mail service. Use only regulated carriers who can advise on shipping instructions, and a tracking system to monitor the delivery.

    5. 5. Can the urn be used to scattered the remains or ashes?

      Yes, many people use the urn to store the ashes, and later scatter the ashes in their desired location. The majority of our urns are well suited to scatter the ashes if desired. And after ashes have been dispersed, the urn is often used as a memorabilia or keep-sake of the loved one.

      Many other customers have used urns as decorative pieces, whether as a vase to hold flowers, items of personal value, wedding rings, watch, lock of hair and much more. It's a personalized symbol between you and your loved one.

    6. 6. What you should know before buying an urn

      An urn is the protection used to maintain the integrity of the ashes or cremated remains of the loved one. When considering an urn, a few points to keep in mind:


      • Where will the cremated remains be stored?

      • Do you know how you will use the urn?

      • When will final disposition take place?

      • Do you want a portion of the cremated remains in multiple locations or retained by more than one person?

      • Do you have security concerns? For example, does the urn come with a lock, or do you understand the process from the time the body is cremated until the time its placed in the urn?

      • Do you have any transportation concerns?

      • Will you apply any engraving for personalization?

    7. 7. What is an urn?

      An urn is a vase used to hold the cremated remains of a loved one. Urns are commonly used to store the remaining ashes from the cremation process, and used not just for a family members who pass and are cremated, but also pets.

      A casket or coffin is the traditional method for a ceremonial and a dignified burial, and among the choice of many religions. It holds the full body of a deceased person for burial, whether the family shrouds them in cloth or clothes of choice.

    8. 8. Shipping a deceased loved one or funeral remains

      Can I ship cremated remains or ashes?


      Yes.  When shipping within the United States we recommend using the United States Postal Service.  They are experienced in these matters and provide a tracking system and furnish receipts upon delivery.

      ALL foreign countries have specific and strict requirements that must be followed.  Check with the consulate office of the foreign country you are shipping to and obtain a copy of their regulations.  It is not advisable to ship cremated remains out of the United States to a foreign country using a mail service.  Use only regulated carriers.

      Can I ship cremated remains or ashes on airplanes?

      Since 9/11, the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) requires urns carried onboard or in checked luggage to pass testing for explosive devices.

      Carry-on: All carry-on items must pass through the x-ray machine. If the urn is made of a material that prevents the screener from clearly seeing what is inside, the container will not be allowed through security.

      Checked Baggage: You may transport the urn provided it is successfully screened. TSA performs screening using a variety of techniques and if cleared, it will be permitted as checked baggage only.

      CHECK WITH THE AIRLINE BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO TRANSPORT AN URN IN CHECKED BAGGAGE.

      When necessary, the cremated remains can be in a wooden or plastic urn for shipment. A heavy metal or lead-lined urn should be empty and unsealed in checked luggage. Upon reaching your destination, the cremated remains can be transferred from the wooden urn or plastic urn into the heavy metal urn. At all times during shipment, legal documentation and permits must be attached to the urn.

      NOTE:  TSA agents are NOT required to open an urn containing remains – so be sure to call ahead to alleviate any problems.

    9. 9. How to buy an urn for cremation funerals

      If you've decided on a cremation funeral, a funeral urn is a beautiful receptacle to preserve the deceased's remains.  Urns come in several styles, colors and sizes. Urns can be buried or displayed in the home or a columbarium (a vault designed with recesses or niches for urns) or used for scattering.  Be sure to check with your state for any legal restrictions. If you're considering buying an urn online, browser the selection of urns CasketandCoffin.com have available for sale online.

      Funeral urns are available in a wide variety of shapes, materials and sizes.  CasketandCoffin.com offers an extensive selection in wood, marble, bronze, granite, aluminum, cloisonné, and all-natural biodegradable materials.  Most urns come in a classic vase-like shape, but you can find many urns in a box or chest shape, including box-shaped wooden urns, memorial chests, metal urns and flag cases.

      A non-biodegradable urn is recommended when the urn will be enclosed in a vault, displayed in the open or in the home.  If your goal is to scatter remains, an urn with a wide opening and an easily accessible closure is recommended.  Be sure to check with federal, state or local authorities regarding scattering regulations.  Scattering is restricted and/or against the law in many areas and jurisdictions.

      What should I know before buying an urn ? 

      The main purpose of an urn is to protect the integrity of the cremated remains until final disposition or while it is in the custody of a person. Factors to keep in mind include:


      • Where will the cremated remains be stored or held?

      • How will the urn be used?

      • When will final disposition take place?

      • Do you want a portion of the cremated remains in multiple locations or retained by more than one person?

      • Security concerns?

      • Transportation concerns?

      • What form of personalization and/or engraving is desired?


      What are urns made of?

      Urns are typically constructed of bronze, copper, sheet metal, stone, marble, glass, porcelain, crystal and manufactured products such as plastic. Most adult urns have a capacity of approximately 170 to 225 or more cubic inches, large enough for average adult remains.

      What should I Do with my urn?

      Urns containing cremated remains can be buried in a grave, placed in a crypt in a mausoleum, placed in a niche in a columbarium or kept at home or a special location.

      Can I use an urn for scattering ashes or remains?

      Yes, you can.  Sometimes people wish to scatter cremated remains in a location that holds fond memories.  In practicality, many of our urns are suitable for scattering purposes.  After dispersal of the remains, the urn is often used to hold personal memorabilia of the deceased, such as a photo, ring, watch, lock of hair and more.  The urn can also be used as a decorative vase to hold flowers.  Scattering of cremated remains is most easily accomplished using an urn that has a top or bottom that unscrews or has a plate that releases using a standard screwdriver.  NOTE:  Be sure to check with local authorities before scattering remains.

      What size of urn should I purchase?

      Urns usually state whether they are large/adult or another size.  The capacity of the urn will be shown on each product page in cubic inches.  As a general rule of thumb, one (1) pound before cremation equals one (1) cubic inch of remains.  For example, if a person weighs 175 pounds prior to cremation, you’ll need an urn that has a capacity of approximately 175 cubic inches.  CasketandCoffin.com offers urns in Adult, Keepsake and Keepsake Heart sizes, as well as a variety of pet urns to accommodate most domestic pets.

      It is recommended that you put the remains into a sealable plastic bag and then put it into the urn.  This way if children become overly curious, you wish a different urn or anything unusual happens, it will be easy to replace the urn if you need to without losing any of the ashes.

      Keepsakes

      Keepsakes are miniature urns.  They allow family members and friends to share a loved ones remains as a personal heirloom.  If internment, burial or scattering is chosen for the deceased, a keepsake is a personal way to remember the individual.